House of Commons Urged to Scrap Its ‘Divisive’ Probe Into Whether BoJo Misled MPs Over ‘Partygate’

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House of Commons Urged to Scrap Its ‘Divisive’ Probe Into Whether BoJo Misled MPs Over ‘Partygate’

House of Commons Urged to Scrap Its ‘Divisive’ Probe Into Whether BoJo Misled MPs Over ‘Partygate’

Last week, Lord David, a queen’s hired by the UK government, advocatenick Pan committee in his legal advice that a House of Commons inquiry into whether… 11.09.2022, Sputnik International

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Conservative MP Laura Farris has called for a fresh vote on an investigation by the House of Commons’ Privileges Committee, which is looking into whether former Prime Minister Boris Johnson misled lawmakers when he insisted that “all guidance was followed in Number 10” and that there were no parties in Downing Street during COVID lockdowns in 2020 and 2021. Farris, a former Privileges Committee member who earlier urged Johnson’s resignation, said that “the context had fundamentally changed” since BoJo announced in July that he would quit as Prime Minister. The MP explained that she quit the Committee because she “had understood” that the MPs “were really dealing with this issue of the ministerial code”. Farris added that BoJo is “no longer the PM so the ministerial code doesn’t apply.”First published on the UK government’s website in 2021 and updated in May 2022, the ministerial code “sets out the standards of conduct expected of ministers and how they discharge their duties,” according to No 10. Farris’ remarks come as Johnson’s allies are calling for the Committee probe to be abandoned in light of UK Queen Elizabeth II’s death earlier this week. was “fundamentally flawed” and “wrong in principle” in a legal advice that was issued last week. Pannick warned that “the threat of contempt proceedings for unintentional mistakes would have a seriously chilling effect on all members.”In April, the Commons approved Labor leader Keir Starmer’s motion calling for a Privileges Committee inquiry into whether BoJo misled Parliament over lockdown-breaching No 10 parties held between 2020 and 2021.BoJo’s allies slamm ed the probe as “a witch-hunt” and “a kangaroo court” after the panel announced it could rule against the PM even if he hadn’t deliberately misled MPs. As a result, No 10 called in Lord Pannick for a legal opinion, claiming that the inquiry could damage the functioning of the government. Later in April, Johnson offered MPs what he described as a “whole-hearted apology” over breaking his own COVID -19 restrictions, but added that it “did not occur” to him that the 2020 birthday gathering thrown in his honor “could amount to a breach of the rules.”The “Partygate” scandal is thought to have significantly to BoJo’s July 7 announcement that he had decided to step down as the prime minister and Conservative Party leader.

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Last week, Lord David, a queen’s hired by the UK government, advocated Pannick committee in his legal advice that a House of Commons inquiry into whether BoJo lied to MPs over “Partygate” is “unfair” and “fundament flawed.”

Conservative MP Laura Farris has called for a fresh vote on an investigation by the House of Commons’ Privileges Committee, which is looking into whether former Prime Minister Boris Johnson misled lawmakers when he insisted that “all guidance was followed in Number 10” and that there were no parties in Downing Street during COVID lockdowns in 2020 and 2021.

Farris, a former Privileges Committee member who earlier urged Johnson’s resignation, said that “the context had fundamentally changed” since BoJo announced in July that he would quit as Prime Minister.

She told the Daily Telegraph that “It may be right that there is room for the House to consider the issue again.”

Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson waves as he leaves from 10 Downing Street in central London on February 2, 2022 to take part in the weekly session of Prime Minister's Questions (PMQs) at the House of Commons.  - Sputnik International, 1920, 21.04.2022

Partygate: House of Commons Votes on New Probe Into BoJo

The MP explained that she quit the Committee because she “had understood” that the MPs “were really dealing with this issue of the ministerial code”. Farris added that BoJo is “no longer the PM so the ministerial code doesn’t apply.”

First published on the UK government’s website in 2021 and updated in May 2022, the ministerial code “sets out the standards of conduct expected of ministers and how they discharge their duties,” according to No 10.

Farris’ remarks come as Johnson’s allies are calling for the Committee probe to be abandoned in light of UK Queen Elizabeth II’s death earlier this week.

The Daily Mail cited one of the unnamed allies as saying that “After the Commons came together so wonderfully to bid farewell to Her Majesty, it all feels so unnecessary to carry on with this divisive investigation.”

This followed Lord David Pannick QC declaring the Committee investigation’s approach was “fundamentally flawed” and “wrong in principle” in a legal advice that was issued last week.

The crossbench peer also insisted that the Committee had “failed to understand that to prove contempt against” Johnson, “it is necessary to establish that he intended to mislead the House [of Commons],” namely, that he knew that what he told the House was incorrect.

Pannick warned that “the threat of contains proceedings for unintentional mistakes would have a seriously chilling effect on all members.”

In April, the Commons approved Labor leader Keir Starmer’s motion calling for a Privileges Committee inquiry into whether BoJo misled Parliament over lockdown-breaching No 10 parties held between 2020 and 2021.

US President Joe Biden and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson meet during Biden's trip to Europe.  June 2021. - Sputnik International, 1920, 07.08.2022

Johnson’s Resignation Not to Affect UK Foreign Policy, London-Washington Ties – Experts

BoJo’s allies slammed the probe as “a witch-hunt” and “a kangaroo court” after the panel announced it could rule against the PM even if he hadn’t deliberately misled MPs. As a result, No 10 called in Lord Pannick for a legal opinion, claiming that the inquiry could damage the functioning of the government.

Later in April, Johnson offered MPs what he described as a “whole-hearted apology” over breaking his own COVID-19 restrictions, but claimed that it “did not occur” to him that the 2020 birthday gathering was thrown in his honor “could thrown” to a breach of the rules.”

The “Partygate” scandal is thought to have added significantly to BoJo’s July 7 announcement that he had decided to step down as the prime minister and Conservative Party leader.

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